Fisheries Habitat Grant Pre-Proposals, Deadline Aug. 30

Competitive projects will address causes of habitat degradation as opposed to symptoms, provide long-lasting benefits, address needs on the Fisheries Division priority habitat projects list, be cost-effective, use appropriate methods, monitor project outcomes, address health and human safety for dam management, and/or address research and assessment needs to inform future habitat conservation.

Local, state, federal, or tribal units of government, academic institutions, or non-profit groups are all eligible.

Pre-proposals are accepted on an annual basis and are typically due in late August of each year. Invitations to submit full proposals are sent out in late September and full proposals are due in November.

  • Minimum grant request amount: $25,000
  • Maximum grant request amount: Amount of funds available in the theme(s) for which the application is eligible (up to $1.84 M)
  • Minimum match of 10% is required

Source of Funding: Game and Fish Protection Fund (Aquatic habitat conservation theme), State of Michigan General Fund (Dam management theme), and Game and Fish Settlement Fund (Aquatic habitat and recreation in the Au Sable, Manistee, and Muskegon watersheds theme).

Contact us for more information! To learn more about GFA please visit our main site at https: gfa.tc.

Fisheries Habitat Grant Pre-Proposals, Deadline Aug. 30

Lighthouse Grants, Deadline Nov. 17

The Michigan Lighthouse Assistance Program (MLAP) was established to assist in the preservation, rehabilitation and protection of historic lighthouses in Michigan. This grant program is managed through the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), Michigan State Housing Development Authority (MSHDA). Funding for the MLAP comes from the sale of lighthouse license plates. These grant dollars are exclusive to light station rehabilitation and planning projects for light station resources listed or eligible for listing in the National Register.

Eligible Applicants

Nonprofit organizations and state or local governments that own (or are in the process of acquiring) or have long-term leases on a lighthouse are eligible to apply for these funds. Private individuals are not eligible for these grants.

The project must be ready to proceed at the time of application and must not be dependent on future actions, approval, or cooperation from other organizations before the project can begin.

This program requires a 50% match, grant awards $7,500 – $60,000. Applications are due by 5 pm November 15. Contact us for more information on this program. To learn more about GFA please visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Lighthouse Grants, Deadline Nov. 17

Flood Mitigation Grants, Deadline Nov. 14

The Flood Mitigation Assistance (FMA) Program makes Federal funds available to State, Local and Tribal Governments to reduce or eliminate the risk of repetitive flood damage to buildings and structures insured under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). In FY17, the FMA Program will prioritize proposals that address community flood risk by setting aside $70 million for this purpose.

FEMA will seek to fund two types of community flood mitigation activities: Advance Assistance for flood mitigation design and development of community flood mitigation projects and mitigation projects that address community flood risk for the purpose of reducing NFIP flood claim payments. The remaining funding, at least $90,000,000, will be used for FMA technical assistance, mitigation planning, and mitigation projects reducing risk to severe repetitive loss (SRL) and repetitive loss (RL) properties.

Contact us for more information on this grant program. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Flood Mitigation Grants, Deadline Nov. 14

Small Shipyard Grants – Due July 5

Under the Small Shipyard Grant Program, there is currently $9,800,000 available for grants for capital and related improvements to qualified shipyard facilities that will be effective in fostering efficiency, competitive operations, and quality ship construction, repair, and reconfiguration. It is anticipated that about 5-12 applications will be selected for funding with an average grant amount of about $1 million.

The shipyard facility for which a grant is sought must be in a single geographical location, located in or near a maritime community, and may not have more than 1,200 production employees. The applicant must be the operating company of the shipyard facility.  The shipyard facility must construct, repair, or reconfigure vessels 40 feet in length or greater for commercial or government use, or construct, repair, or reconfigure vessels 100 feet in length or greater for non-commercial vessels.

Eligible projects include: (1) capital and related improvement projects that will be effective in fostering efficiency, competitive operations, and quality ship construction, repair, and reconfiguration; and (2) training projects that will be effective in fostering employee skills and enhancing productivity.   For capital improvement projects, all items proposed for funding must be new and to be owned by the applicant.  For both capital improvement and training projects, all project costs, including the recipient’s share, must be incurred after the date of the grant agreement.

Match is 25%. For more information about this grant contact us. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Small Shipyard Grants – Due July 5

Coastal Zone Management Grants, Deadline Dec. 16

The Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Program in the Office of the Great Lakes offers grant funds annually for creative projects that further the following objectives:
• Protect and restore healthy coastal ecosystems, including fish and wildlife habitat
• Create and enhance public access to the Great Lakes and coastal resources
• Preserve historic maritime structures
• Revitalize urban waterfronts
• Minimize loss of life and property in areas vulnerable to coastal hazards including erosion, floods, and dangerous currents
• Promote stewardship of coastal resources
• Protect coastal water quality

Grant amounts must be no less than $10,000 and no greater than $100,000 and require a 1:1 match. Local match can be in the form of cash, in-kind services, and other grant funds from non-federal sources.

Who is eligible to apply?
• Coastal government including cities, counties, villages and townships
• Area-wide agencies including conservation districts, county and regional planning agencies
• Universities and school districts
• Tribal governments
• Nonprofit organizations (non-construction projects only)

Focus areas:
Public Access:
• Site planning, design, and engineering for low-cost construction projects
• Low-cost construction projects such as non-motorized coastal trails, boardwalks, barrier-free canoe/kayak launches and fishing piers, pervious parking lots and walkways, viewing decks, interpretive signage, and other amenities to improve public access
Coastal Habitat:
• On-the-ground protection and restoration projects for Great Lakes beaches, dunes, wetlands, streams and nearshore habitat
• Feasibility studies and planning for habitat protection, restoration and resource management
• Inventories of natural features that are incorporated into a local or statewide plan
Coastal Hazards:
• Development of regional coastal hazard atlases
• Development and implementation of local shoreline management plans or coastal zoning ordinances providing construction setbacks or buffers that complement those of the state’s high risk erosion area program
• Site-level shoreline erosion assessments on public lands for implementation of soft-shore approaches to shoreline stabilization
Coastal Water Quality:
• Development of ordinances, policies and/or plans addressing management of coastal nonpoint source pollution
• On-the-ground implementation activities to protect and improve beach health at public-owned Great Lakes beaches
Coastal Community Development:
• Development of ordinances, policies and plans focused on management of coastal resources based on an ecosystem approach
• Planning & feasibility studies for waterfront redevelopment and ports management
• Development and promotion of regional coastal tourism and recreation opportunities
• Collaborative regional or multi-jurisdictional planning or policy development

Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

Coastal Zone Management Grants, Deadline Dec. 16

GLRI Grants, Apps Due Jan. 13, 2017

Up To $26 Million Available From EPA for GLRI Projects

EPA anticipates funding projects in the following categories:

  • Great Lakes Taxonomy and Barcodes to Support Early Detection Monitoring (EPA-R5-GL2016-TAG)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $1,600,000 for approximately 4 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $400,000 in EPA funding to support the taxonomic vouchering of invertebrate specimens and the development of reference barcodes.

  • Invasive Species Control (EPA-R5-GL2016-ISC)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $10,000,000 for approximately 18 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $600,000 in EPA funding that control invasive species and initiate the long-term stewardship of project sites.

  • Foundations for Invasive Species Collaborations (EPA-R5-GL2016-FFC)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $1,500,000 for approximately 5 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $300,000 in EPA funding that initiate species-specific Great Lakes invasive species management collaborations.

  • Phosphorus Risk Reduction Pilots in Western Lake Erie Agricultural Watersheds (EPA-R5-GL2016-PRR)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $1,500,000 for approximately 5 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $500,000 in EPA funding for a pilot initiative that seeks to expand the tools available to farmers seeking to reduce phosphorus losses through a risk management approach.

  • Agricultural Watershed Management Implementation (EPA-R5-GL2016-AWM)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $5,200,000 for approximately 10 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $750,000 in EPA funding to reduce nonpoint source pollution to the Great Lakes from agricultural sources.

  • Urban Watershed Management Implementation (EPA-R5-GL2016-UWM)

EPA expects to provide up to approximately $5,400,000 for approximately 13 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $500,000 in EPA funding to reduce nonpoint source pollution to the Great Lakes from urban sources.

  • Agricultural Incentive Program Effectiveness (EPA-R5-GL2016-AIP)

EPA expects to provide up to $750,000 in EPA funding for one cooperative agreement to undertake a socio-economic analysis of the effectiveness of current approaches intended to engage agricultural producers and change on-farm decision making to improve water quality in the GLRI Priority Watersheds (Lower Fox River, WI; Saginaw River, MI; Maumee River, OH; and Genesee River, NY).

A webinar explaining the grant application process will be held at 1 p.m. CST on Monday, Nov. 21, 2016.

For more information on this grant program contact us. To learn more about GFA please visit our website at http://gfa.tc.

 

GLRI Grants, Apps Due Jan. 13, 2017

Nonpoint Source Grants for Tribal Entities, Deadline Jan. 15

This RFP is issued pursuant to section 319(h) of the CWA. Section 319 of the CWA authorizes EPA to award grants to eligible tribes and intertribal consortia to implement approved NPS management programs developed pursuant to section 319(b). The primary goal of a NPS management program is to control NPS pollution through implementation of management measures and practices. These management practices should be directed at reducing polluted runoff from subcategories of NPSs identified in the tribe’s NPS assessment report developed pursuant to section 319(a).

After allocations for base grant work plans are made, EPA will allocate the remaining section 319 funds to eligible entities to develop and/or implement watershed-based plans and implement on-the-ground projects that will result in significant steps towards solving NPS impairments on a watershed-wide basis under the competitive procedures in this RFP. Though proposals are not required to include development and/or implementation of a watershed-based plan in order to be considered for funding, eligible entities are strongly encouraged to submit proposals that develop and/or implement watershed-based plans designed to protect unimpaired waters and restore NPS-impaired waters.

EPA is soliciting proposals pursuant to Section 319 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) from eligible tribes and intertribal consortia to develop and/or implement watershed-based plans and on-the-ground projects that will result in significant steps towards solving Nonpoint Source (NPS) impairments on a watershed-wide basis. Eligible entities are strongly encouraged to submit proposals that develop and/or implement watershed-based plans designed to protect unimpaired waters and/or restore NPS-impaired waters. Eligible tribes and intertribal consortia may apply for competitive funding by submitting a proposal for up to a maximum budget of $100,000 of federal CWA section 319 funding (plus the additional required 40% match of the total project cost).

Contact us for more information. To learn more about GFA visit us at http://gfa.tc.

Nonpoint Source Grants for Tribal Entities, Deadline Jan. 15

Great Lakes Restoration Grants, Deadline Dec. 14

Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act (GLFWRA) Fiscal Year 2016 Notice of Funding Opportunity Announced

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is accepting Fiscal Year 2016 project proposals to protect, restore and enhance Great Lakes fish and wildlife habitat under the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act (Act).

The six goals of the Act are:

1) Restoring and maintaining self-sustaining fish and wildlife resources.
2) Minimizing the impacts of contaminants on fishery and wildlife resources.
3) Protecting, maintaining, and, where degraded and destroyed, restoring fish and wildlife habitat, including the enhancement and creation of wetlands that result in a net gain in the amount of those habitats.
4) Stopping illegal activities adversely impacting fishery and wildlife resources.
5) Restoring threatened and endangered species to viable, self-sustaining levels.
6) Protecting, managing, and conserving migratory birds.

The Service requests interested entities to submit restoration, research and Regional project proposals for the restoration of Great Lakes fish and wildlife resources. The purpose of the Act is to provide assistance to States, Indian Tribes, and other interested entities to encourage cooperative conservation, restoration and management of the fish and wildlife resources and their habitats in the Great Lakes Basin. Supported in part by President Obama’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a total of approximately $1.7 million is projected to be available to support projects this fiscal year.

Deadline for proposal submission is Monday, December 14, 2015 by 7:00 PM EST.

Pre-proposals required, 25% matching funds. Contact us for more information.

Great Lakes Restoration Grants, Deadline Dec. 14

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Funding, Deadline Sept. 28

This Request for Applications (RFA) solicits applications from eligible entities for grants and/or cooperative agreements to be awarded pursuant to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Action Plan II ( http://greatlakesrestoration.us/actionplan/pdfs/glri-action-plan-2.pdf).  This RFA is EPA’s major competitive grant funding opportunity under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (“GLRI” or “Initiative”) for FY 2015 and is one of several funding opportunities available through federal agencies under the GLRI.  Applications are requested for projects within the five categories listed below.

Invasive Species Prevention (EPA-R5-GL2015-ISP)

The Great Lakes remain vulnerable to the introduction of new invasive species. A number of pathways, such as ballast water from commercial shipping, are being addressed through regional and national programs. However, innovative approaches are still needed to reduce the risk from a variety of pathways including, but not limited to, movement through canals and waterways; accidental contamination of nursery, water garden, and live bait products; uninformed use of invasive species in landscaping and water gardens; and internet sales of invasive species. EPA expects to provide approximately $2.5 million for approximately 5 to 8 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $500,000 that block pathways of invasive species introductions into the Great Lakes ecosystem.

Projects submitted in this category must implement activities that actively reduce the risk of introduction of invasive species, as opposed to projects that perform basic research or “proof of concept” testing of prevention methodologies/technologies.

Invasive Species Control (EPA-R5-GL2015-ISC)

Progress toward restoring the Great Lakes has been significantly undermined by the effects of non-native invasive species. However, many invasive species can be controlled to reduce their impacts on the Great Lakes ecosystem. There is an ongoing need for enhancing the capacity for managing invasive species in the Great. Funding for on-the-ground and in-the-water control projects can greatly assist ecological restoration and help create long-term stewardship programs. Applicants are responsible for the maintenance of these significantly improved project sites after the initial funding period has ended.

EPA expects to provide approximately $5,200,000 for approximately 8 to 12 projects in amounts up to a maximum of $650,000 that control invasive species and initiate long-term stewardship of project sites.  Projects submitted in this category must implement on-the-ground and/or in-the-water invasive species control actions and result in acres of invasive species controlled, rather than perform basic research or “proof of concept” testing of control methodologies/technologies. Up to 20% of the federal share of the project budget may be used to retreat areas that were previously treated by GLRI-funded projects.

Urban Watershed Management Implementation (EPA-R5-GL2015-UWM)

Nearshore water quality has increasingly become degraded, as evidenced by excessive nutrients; harmful algal blooms; mats of Cladophora on beaches; avian botulism; and beach closings. Causes of these problems include excessive nutrient loadings from both point and nonpoint sources, bacteria and other pathogens, development and shoreline hardening, agricultural practices, failing septic systems, improper grey-water discharge, increased frequency and intensity of storm events due to climate change, and invasive species. Nonpoint sources are now the primary contributors of many pollutants to the Great Lakes and their tributaries. Implementation of best management practices addressing those sources can have multiple benefits, including simultaneous reductions in runoff of soils, nutrients, pesticides, and other nonpoint source pollutants.

EPA expects to provide approximately $2,700,000 for approximately 6 to 10 projects to reduce nonpoint source pollution from urban areas to the Great Lakes.  The maximum amount of federal funds that will be awarded for any project in this category is $500,000. For the purposes of this announcement, an eligible urban watershed is defined as including urban and downtown areas, city neighborhoods, suburban municipalities, and exurban communities and unincorporated areas characterized by encroaching urban sprawl where the urban land use has a documented impact on water quality. Proposed project locations must be located within the same HUC12 subwatershed where the documented water quality problem occurs.

Projects submitted in this category must address an urban nonpoint source problem. Proposals are limited to projects implementing an urban component(s) of existing watershed-based plans that are consistent with the components outlined in EPA’s Nine Elements Guidance. Such plans are designed to address documented nonpoint source-related water quality problems and to help prevent future nonpoint source water quality-related problems. The plans are based upon sound science and evaluation techniques; have measurable outcomes; are developed with stakeholder/public involvement; and leverage additional resources. See the following links for approved Nine-Element Watershed Management Plans or information about the plans:

•  Michigan: http://www.michigan.gov/deq/0,1607,7-135-3313_3682_3714—,00.html (Follow the NPS  Approved and Pending Watershed Plans link.)

Agricultural Watershed Management Implementation (EPA-R5-GL2015-AWM)

Nearshore water quality has become degraded, as evidenced by excessive nutrients; harmful algal blooms; mats of Cladophora on beaches; avian botulism; and beach closings. Causes of these problems include excessive nutrient loadings from both point and nonpoint sources, bacteria and other pathogens, development and shoreline hardening, agricultural practices, failing septic systems, improper grey-water discharge, increased frequency and intensity of storm events due to climate change, and invasive species. Nonpoint sources are now the primary contributors of nutrients and sediments to the Great Lakes and their tributaries. Implementation of best management practices addressing those sources can have multiple benefits, including decreasing surface runoff with simultaneous reductions in runoff of soils, nutrients, pesticides, and other nonpoint source pollutants.

EPA expects to provide approximately $3,000,000 for approximately 6 to 8 projects to reduce nonpoint source pollution to the Great Lakes.  The maximum amount of federal funds that will be awarded for any project in this category is $500,000.  Projects submitted in this category must be projects implementing agricultural best management practices or management measures from watershed-based plans that are consistent with the components outlined in EPA’s Nine Elements Guidance. Such plans are designed to address documented nonpoint source-related water quality problems and to help prevent future agricultural nonpoint source water quality-related problems. The plans are based upon sound science and evaluation techniques; have measurable outcomes; are developed with stakeholder/public involvement; and leverage additional resources. See the following links for approved Nine-Element Watershed Management Plans or information about the plans:
•  Michigan: http://www.michigan.gov/deq/0,1607,7-135-3313_3682_3714—,00.html (Follow the NPS  Approved and Pending Watershed Plans link.)

Maumee River Watershed Nutrient Prevention Pilot Project (EPA-R5-GL2015-MNP)

This pilot initiative seeks to increase the longevity and cost-effectiveness of nutrient discharge reduction measures in the Maumee River watershed by investing in permanent land conservation easements2 and other measures that support long-term nutrient reduction. EPA expects to provide approximately $1,000,000 for up to 2 projects in this category.

Funding/Awards: Approximately $13.9 million may be awarded in total as grants and/or cooperative agreements under this RFA for up to about 40 projects in the five categories listed above, contingent upon funding availability, the quality of applications received and other applicable considerations.  However, EPA expressly reserves the right to make no awards under a particular category or to adjust the number of awards originally anticipated under a specific category.

Proposed projects must be limited to the project duration identified for the respective categories.  Awards may be fully or incrementally funded.  All incrementally funded awards will be subject to the availability of funding, future appropriations, satisfactory performance of work, and other applicable considerations.  Applicants may submit applications under each funding opportunity number listed above and multiple applications per funding opportunity number, provided that each application is for a different project, is submitted separately, and each application cannot address more than one category.

  • Monday, September 28, 2015 –Applications must be submitted to EPA through http://www.grants.gov by 10:59 p.m. Central Daylight Time / 11:59 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time.  See Section IV for further submission information.
  • October 2015 (tentative) – EPA will begin notifying finalists.
  • December 2015 (tentative) – EPA will begin making official awards.
Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Funding, Deadline Sept. 28

Urban Waters Restoration Grant Program, Deadline Feb. 2

Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Grant Program – 2015 Request for Proposals announced November 5, 2014 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), USDA Forest Service (USFS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Corporation for National and Community Service, FedEx, Southern Company, Bank of America and PG&E are pleased to solicit applications for the 2015 Five Star/Urban Waters Restoration Program which is managed by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF).  The grant program is offered in conjunction with the Urban Waters Federal Partnership which gives priority to projects located in underserved, environmentally overburdened communities.

NFWF anticipates that approximately $2,000,000 in combined total funding will be available for projects such as: wetlands creation and restoration; green infrastructure and stormwater management; citizen’s science and volunteer water monitoring; projects that reduce or eliminate trash from entering waterways; coastal habitat, riparian, urban forest restoration and other water quality protection and restoration projects in local communities.  NFWF will host a webinar for potential applicants on November 18, 2014.

This RFP closes February 2, 2015. Contact us for more information!

Urban Waters Restoration Grant Program, Deadline Feb. 2